Mises U 2022

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Faculty Panel: Policy and History

Faculty Panel at Mises University 2022

Tags StrategyU.S. HistoryWorld HistoryAustrian Economics OverviewPolitical Theory

07/29/2022Per BylundThomas J. DiLorenzoSandra KleinPatrick NewmanTimothy D. TerrellRobert P. MurphyLucas M. Engelhardt

Featuring Per Bylund, Tom DiLorenzo, Lucas Engelhardt, Sandy Klein, Robert Murphy, Patrick Newman, and Tim Terrell. Recorded at the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama, on 29 July 2022.

Note: The views expressed on Mises.org are not necessarily those of the Mises Institute.
Authors:

Contact Robert P. Murphy

Robert P. Murphy is a Senior Fellow with the Mises Institute. He is the author of numerous books: Contra Krugman: Smashing the Errors of America's Most Famous Keynesian; Chaos Theory; Lessons for the Young Economist; Choice: Cooperation, Enterprise, and Human Action; The Politically Incorrect Guide to Capitalism; Understanding Bitcoin (with Silas Barta), among others. He is also host of The Bob Murphy Show.

Contact Thomas J. DiLorenzo

Thomas DiLorenzo is a former professor of economics at Loyola University Maryland and a member of the senior faculty of the Mises Institute. He is the author of The Real Lincoln; How Capitalism Saved America; Lincoln Unmasked; Hamilton's Curse; Organized Crime: The Unvarnished Truth About Government; and The Problem with Socialism.

Contact Timothy D. Terrell

Timothy Terrell is professor of economics at Wofford College in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He is assistant editor of the Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics and is a Senior Fellow of the Mises Institute.

Contact Per Bylund

Per Bylund is associateprofessor of entrepreneurship & Records-Johnston Professor of Free Enterprise in the School of Entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University. Website: PerBylund.com.

Contact Lucas M. Engelhardt

Lucas M. Engelhardt is an associate professor of Economics at Kent State University's Stark Campus. His work is in macroeconomics, primarily in examining how various assumptions about capital affect business cycle models.

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