Taxes and Spending

Displaying 1 - 10 of 1401

Why the Debt Ceiling Won't Limit Debt or Spending

Money and BanksTaxes and Spending

Blog01/01/2022

From its inception, the Fed's job has been to pay off the debt and cover excess expenditures with newly printed paper money.

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The Inca Empire: An Indigenous Leviathan State

Property RightsTaxes and SpendingWorld History

Blog11/24/2021

So oppressive was the Inca regime that it's no wonder the Spaniards found many enemies willing to help topple the empire.

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Biden's Infrastructure Plan Points to Even More Price Inflation

Taxes and Spending

Blog11/13/2021

An additional—and quick—$1 trillion spending boost in energy-intensive and material consuming industries is likely to create new problems in terms of inflation and supply shortages.

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Industrial Policy—a.k.a. Central Planning—Won't Make America Great

Bureaucracy and RegulationTaxes and Spending

Blog11/05/2021

China's industrial policy has been marked by many failures and few successes. Rather, China's real growth has been fueled by the regime's limited turn to markets. 

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The Madness of Taxing Unrealized Capital Gains

Taxes and Spending

Blog11/04/2021

The new proposal is framed as a tax on the ultrarich. The same was true of the new income tax in 1913. If given the power to tax unrealized gains, expect the feds to expand the tax to ordinary people.

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Why Business Owners Can't Just "Pass on" Tax Costs to Consumers

Taxes and Spending

Blog10/26/2021

If business owners could increase their prices without a loss in sales, they would have already done so. Yet many conservatives mistakenly claim tax increases are just "passed on" to consumers.

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Who Will Build the Roads? Anyone Who Stands to Benefit from Them.

Taxes and Spending

Blog10/18/2021

The appropriate question is not “Who will build the roads?” but rather “Who will pay for them without taxation?” History suggests the answer is "lots of people" and the "public goods" theory is wrong.

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The 2021 Nobel Prize and the Trend of Economic Thinking

BiographiesCapitalismProtectionism and Free TradeTaxes and SpendingInterventionismOther Schools of Thought

Blog10/11/2021

The 2021 Nobel Prize in Economics has been awarded to Berkeley's David Card, MIT's Josh Angrist, and Stanford's Guido Imbens for their work on "natural experiments," a currently fashionable approach to estimating the causal impact of one economic variable on another. 

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Why Americans Would Benefit from a Government Default

Big GovernmentTaxes and Spending

Blog10/05/2021

With default we restore trillions to the private sector and permanently reduce government’s ability to hog the resources we need to maintain prosperity. 

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The Covid Stimulus Isn’t Like Other Stimulus. It’s Much Bigger.

Taxes and Spending

Blog08/25/2021

We have to go back to 1945 and the Second World War to find a time in which government spending is similar to today's panic-driven frenzy of spending in Washington. 

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