The Journal of Libertarian Studies

Home | Mises Library | Felix Morley and the Commonwealth Tradition: The Country-party, Centralization, and the American Empire

Felix Morley and the Commonwealth Tradition: The Country-party, Centralization, and the American Empire

  • The Journal of Libertarian Studies
0 Views

Tags Big GovernmentInterventionism

07/30/2014Leonard P. Liggio

Some years ago in Modern Age (Winter, 1958-59). in a poem dedicated to Robert A. Taft, Sr., he was referred to as "Old Round- head", and compared to the English revolutionary, John Pym (1584-1643). The historical connotations and the loving insights revealed by that designation are highly significant. In the 20th century, Taft, indeed, did represent the anti-Court, anti-Executive Establishment, Country-Party tradition of the Roundheads, the Commonwealthmen, and the Independent Whigs. He revealed the courage of that tradition by resisting the blandishments of the modern Court Party, when in 1940 he was offered its support for the nomination to the presidency if he would drop his commitment to the principles of isolationism and if he would support the policy of assistance to England.

Volume 2, Number 3 (1978)

Cite This Article

Liggio, Leonard P. "Felix Morley and the Commonwealth Tradition: The Country-party, Centralization, and the American Empire." Journal of Libertarian Studies 2, No.3 (1978): 279-286.

Shield icon interview