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Social Scientists, Schooling, and the Acculturation of Immigrants in 19th Century America

  • The Journal of Libertarian Studies
Leonard P. LiggioJoseph R. Peden

Tags EducationMonopoly and Competition

The last several years have witnessed a remarkable outpouring of criticism of the American system of public education. While the usual attacks on the quality of the instruction, the character of the curriculum offerings and the cost efficiency of its operations continue to be the concern of many, several critics have begun to challenge the very fundamental character and purposes, the very legitimacy, of the traditional public, or common schools. Considering its almost total monopoly over the use of public funds, and its control over roughly 90% of the school age children, some critics see the public schools as an actual or potential instrument of corporate capitalism, of the educational bureaucracy, of an increasingly manipulative State; some see them as instruments of social, cultural and moral homogenization, designed to weaken and even destroy racial, ethnic, religious and personal cultural diversity.

Volume 2, Number 1 (1978)

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Liggio, Leonard P., and Joseph R. Peden. "Social Scientists, Schooling, and the Acculturation of Immigrants in 19th Century America." Journal of Libertarian Studies 2, No.1 (1978): 69-84.