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  • Tate Fegley

Tate Fegley

Tags Legal SystemPrivate Property

AwardsGrant Aldrich Graduate Student Essay Prize at AERC

Tate Fegley is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Center for Governance and Markets at the University of Pittsburgh. He received his Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University, and he has a B.A. in economics, B.S. in criminal justice, and M.A. in criminal justice from Boise State University. He was a Mises Institute Fellow in 2015, 2016, and 2018, and winner of the 2018 Grant Aldrich Prize for Best Graduate Student paper at the Austrian Economics Research Confernce. His CV can be found at TateFegley.com

All Works

How Government-Owned Streets Prevent Effective Law Enforcement

The Police StatePrivate Property

09/17/2020Audio/Video
“Taking back the streets” ought to mean privatizing them and enabling property owners to defend their property. This would be the surest way to end the riots.
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How Government-Owned Streets Prevent Effective Law Enforcement

The Police StatePrivate Property

Blog09/12/2020

“Taking back the streets” ought to mean privatizing them and enabling property owners to defend their property. This would be the surest way to end the riots.

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How Government Roads Expand Police Power in America

The Police StateCalculation and KnowledgePrivate Property

08/25/2020Audio/Video
The case for the privatization of roads has much to recommend it if only in terms of how it would affect the power of the police to detain us, search us, and seize our property.
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How Government Roads Expand Police Power in America

The Police StateCalculation and KnowledgePrivate Property

Blog08/20/2020

The case for the privatization of roads has much to recommend it if only in terms of how it would affect the power of the police to detain us, search us, and seize our property.

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How the Police Arbitration System Shields Police from Accountability

Blog06/17/2020

Legal arbitration only makes sense when all parties involved voluntarily enter into a contract. With police arbitration, the public has no seat at the table. It's a system designed to protect police only.

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