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Patrick Newman

Tags U.S. EconomyMoney and BankingProduction Theory

Works Published inSpeeches and PresentationsQuarterly Journal of Austrian Economics

Dr. Patrick Newman, a Fellow of the Mises Institute, is assistant professor of economics at Florida Southern College and a Fellow of its Center for Free Enterprise. He completed his PhD in economics at George Mason University. His primary research interests include Austrian economics, monetary theory, and late 19th- and early 20th-century American economic history. He is editor of Murray Rothbard's The Progressive Era (Mises Institute, 2017), along with his brilliant transcription and editing of Rothbard's "lost' 5th volume of Conceived in Liberty: The New Republic, 1784-1791 (Mises Institute 2019).

All Works

Dr. Patrick Newman Introduces Rothbard's History of Economic Thought

Book ReviewsWorld History

09/24/2021Mises Media
Dr. Patrick Newman introduces the first in a series of episodes on Rothbard's History of Economic Thought.
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How Nixon and the Rockefellers Teamed Up to Destroy the Dollar

Money and Banks

08/20/2021Mises Media
In 1971, David Rockefeller favored a “new international monetary system with greater flexibility” and “less reliance on gold.” Seeing an opportunity to expand his own power, Richard Nixon enthusiastically embraced the scheme.
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Cronyism: Liberty versus Power in Early America, 1607–1849

Cronyism and CorporatismU.S. History

08/17/2021Books
History is a clash between the forces of liberty and the proponents of power. In Cronyism , Patrick Newman offers a compelling and important narrative on the early days of the American republic, and the rise of a Federal regime that conquers a nation conceived in liberty.
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How Nixon and the Rockefellers Teamed Up to Destroy the Dollar

Money and Banks

Blog08/16/2021

In 1971, David Rockefeller favored a “new international monetary system with greater flexibility” and “less reliance on gold.” Seeing an opportunity to expand his own power, Richard Nixon enthusiastically embraced the scheme. 

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