Profiles

Home | Profile | Gary Galles

Gary Galles

Tags Financial MarketsMonetary Theory

Works Published inMises Daily Article

Gary M. Galles is a Professor of Economics at Pepperdine University and an adjunct scholar at the Ludwig von Mises Institute. He is also a research fellow at the Independent Institute, a member of the Foundation for Economic Education faculty network, and a member of the Heartland Institute Board of Policy Advisors.

His research focuses on public finance, public choice, economic education, organization of firms, antitrust, urban economics, liberty, and the problems that undermine effective public policy. His scholarly articles have appeared in The European Journal of the History of Economics Thought, The American Economist, The Journal of Libertarian Studies, The Journal of Economics and Finance Education, The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, The Atlantic Economic Review, The Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies, and The Independent Review. He has also authored well over 1,000 articles for general audiences, in dozens of outlets. In addition to his most recent book, Pathways to Policy Failures (2020), his books include Lines of Liberty (2016), Faulty Premises, Faulty Policies (2014), and Apostle of Peace (2013).

All Works

There's Nothing Wrong with Short Selling

Cronyism and CorporatismFinancial Markets

Blog02/03/2021

Allowing short selling increases the number of people with an incentive to discover valuable information about firms’ prospects by providing an added mechanism to benefit from information that turns out to be negative. This makes markets more responsive and honest.

Read More

A Fond Farewell to the "Midnight Economist"

01/29/2021Power & Market
Read More

Politicians Talk about Freedom—but Only to Destroy It

01/28/2021Power & Market

Nowadays, any such limited-government words we might hear from politicians (like Biden’s promise to govern in the interests of all Americans) will again represent cognitive dissonance rather than commitment to principle.

Read More

Why Governments Want More Centralization—and Less Federalism

Decentralization and SecessionU.S. History

01/24/2021Mises Media
America’s founders did not envision the federal government as the domineering senior partner in almost everything. What was once best described as “sovereign States, united solely for specified joint purposes” has been largely eviscerated.
Read More

Why Governments Want More Centralization—and Less Federalism

Decentralization and SecessionU.S. History

Blog01/20/2021

America’s founders did not envision the federal government as the domineering senior partner in almost everything. What was once best described as “sovereign States, united solely for specified joint purposes” has been largely eviscerated.

Read More
Shield icon audience