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Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics Newsletter

Frank Shostak's consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments of financial markets and global economies. Contact: email.

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, master's degree from Witwatersrand University and PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University, and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

How Interest Rates Affect Time Preference — and Vice Versa

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog12/27/2016

A general increase in price inflation, resulting from increasing money supply and a fall in real wealth, will lead to a general rise in interest rates.

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Why Are Dollar Bills Worth Anything?

Monetary TheoryMoney and Banking

Blog12/21/2016

Today's paper money does not have value due to some government decree. It's value as money is based on a past connection to commodity money.

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How Inflation and Unemployment Are Related

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog12/13/2016

Easy-money policies destroys wealth and lead to unemployment. When money creation is limited, wealth and employment expand.

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Inflation Is Not About Price Increases

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog12/06/2016

When inflation is seen as a general increase in prices, then anything that contributes to price increases is called inflationary.

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Why It's Important to Define Money Correctly

Money and Banks

Blog11/29/2016

When it comes to understanding how money works, recent attempts to re-define money to fit new economics models miss the point.

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