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Frank Shostak

Tags Financial Markets

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics Newsletter

Frank Shostak's consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. Contact: email.

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, master's degree from Witwatersrand University and PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University, and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

European Central Bank Gets Ready for More Easy Money

Global EconomyMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

02/11/2016Mises Daily Articles
In spite of negative interest rates, Europe's central bank will again attack real wealth generators in order to blow more bubbles.

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Are We Headed for Another Bust?

Booms and BustsThe FedMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

01/05/2016Mises Daily Articles
Like the Greenspan Fed before it, the Yellen Fed has doubled down on easy money, but will trigger a crisis once it tries to inch toward more normal interest rates.

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Why Capitalists Are Repeatedly "Fooled" By Business Cycles

Booms and BustsThe FedMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

12/21/2015Mises Daily Articles
Even when a boom is obvious, it is still in the interests of individual owners and consumers to keep it going.

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Why Gold-Backed Money Doesn’t Bring Booms and Busts

Booms and BustsThe FedMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

12/10/2015Mises Daily Articles
Central bankers would have us believe that creating money “out of thin air” is no problem as long as the “demand for money” increases. They also claim that gold-backed money is more prone to booms and busts. But they’re wrong on both counts...

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How Money Disappears in a Fractional-Reserve Money System

The FedMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

12/02/2015Mises Daily Articles
Fractional-reserve banking systems create money out of thin air, and this causes malinvestments into less valuable and less productive activities. Eventually, banks realize there's trouble ahead, so they cut back on loans which leads to deflation and crisis...

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