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Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics Newsletter

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, his master's degree from Witwatersrand University, and his PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

Does Bank Lending by Itself Set Off Boom and Bust Cycles?

Central BanksInflationMoney and Banks

Blog10/12/2022

What happens when banks lend money? It depends the lending process itself. If lending comes about because of an expansion of credit, then it creates problems.

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The Velocity of Money Circulation Is Another Economic Myth

KeynesMonetary PolicyMonetary Theory

Blog10/07/2022

Anyone who has taken a Keynesian-based macroeconomics course remembers the equation of exchange: MV = PY. This equation, however, is buried in fallacious economic thinking.

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How the Policy of Price Stability Generates Greater Economic Instability

Booms and BustsThe FedInflation

10/06/2022Mises Media
The Fed claims 2 percent inflation promotes "price stability." However, that policy also causes the boom-and-bust cycle, which is anything but stable.
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Should the Fed Increase the Money Supply in Response to a Growing Economy?

The FedMoney and Banks

10/01/2022Mises Media
Standard economic theory states that as an economy grows, the money supply should grow with it. Appealing to the Austrian tradition, Frank Shostak shows that belief is mistaken.
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How the Policy of Price Stability Generates Greater Economic Instability

Booms and BustsThe FedInflation

Blog09/30/2022

The Fed claims 2 percent inflation promotes "price stability." However, that policy also causes the boom-and-bust cycle, which is anything but stable.

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