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Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics Newsletter

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, his master's degree from Witwatersrand University, and his PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

The Origins of the Dollar's Value

Money and BankingMoney Supply

08/15/2020Mises Media
The value of a paper dollar originates from its historical link to commodity money—which happens to be gold—and not government decree or social convention.
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The Origins of the Dollar's Value

Blog08/07/2020

 The value of a paper dollar originates from its historical link to commodity money—which happens to be gold—and not government decree or social convention.

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Why Keynes Was Wrong about Consumer Spending

Blog08/04/2020

In the real world, an artificial boost in demand that is not supported by production leads to the destruction of a society's wealth.

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The Only Long-Term Solution to a Bust Is to Rebuild Savings

Blog07/25/2020

What is required is to seal off all the channels that undermine the generation of real savings. This means that what is required is to close all the loopholes that enable monetary pumping and to cut the government outlays to the bone.

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A Rising Demand for Money Won't Save Us from Inflation

InflationMoney and Banks

Blog07/20/2020

The conventional view is that new money creation is no problem so long as the demand for money is increasing. The conventional view is wrong.

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