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Frank Shostak

Tags Booms and BustsFinancial MarketsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and Banking

Works Published inMises Daily ArticleQuarterly Journal of Austrian EconomicsAustrian Economics Newsletter

Frank Shostak is an Associated Scholar of the Mises Institute. His consulting firm, Applied Austrian School Economics, provides in-depth assessments and reports of financial markets and global economies. He received his bachelor's degree from Hebrew University, his master's degree from Witwatersrand University, and his PhD from Rands Afrikaanse University and has taught at the University of Pretoria and the Graduate Business School at Witwatersrand University.

All Works

Using the "Natural Interest Rate" In Setting Monetary Policy Is an Impossible Dream

Blog09/13/2021

Much talk about the central bank's policy centers on whether the target interest rate is above or below the "natural rate." Unfortunately, we will never know what the natural rate is. 

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We Don't Need a Central Bank to Deal with Changes in the "Demand for Money"

Money and Banks

Blog09/04/2021

Just because the demand for money changes over time doesn't mean we need a money supply that changes over time also. 

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Macroeconomic Data Is a Tool for Government Intervention

U.S. Economy

09/01/2021Mises Media
In a free, unhampered market, businesspersons in the pursuance of their goals will not require macroeconomic indicators. Entrepreneurs require an entirely different kind of data than what government data provides.
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Macroeconomic Data Is a Tool for Government Intervention

U.S. Economy

Blog08/24/2021

In a free, unhampered market, businesspersons in the pursuance of their goals will not require macroeconomic indicators. Entrepreneurs require an entirely different kind of data than what government data provides.

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This Is How Savings and Investment Pave the Way for an Advanced Economy

Money and Banks

Blog08/14/2021

Modern economies produce a seemingly endless supply of goods. But without the "subsistence fund," built on saving and investment, the mountain of goods we take for granted would be impossible. 

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