Mises Wire

Coronavirus Panic: From Trillion-Dollar Paternalism to "Cash for Bunkers"

Big GovernmentHealthPrice Controls

Blog03/21/2020

You are not even allowed to ask: "Is the price we’re paying worth it?" or "Is this an abundance of caution, or an overdose?" The "serious people" attack anyone who urges calm and encourages others to adopt a "don’t panic" approach. The new party line is: panic = virtue.

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The Chinese Regime Has Made China's Woes Much Worse

Cronyism and CorporatismHealthSocialism

Blog03/21/2020

Whether we're talking public health or economic growth, the Chinese regime's love of intervention and centralization has led to one crisis after another.

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Fail: Quantitative Methods Presume That Human Action Is Reflexive

Philosophy and MethodologyPraxeology

Blog03/21/2020

Quantitative methods can't be applied to human action, which is purposeful and not a mere reflex. For this reason, mathematical formulas can only describe events, never explain them.

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A Fallacy About Negative Externalities

Philosophy and MethodologySubjectivism

Blog03/20/2020

Some people use the concept of negative externalities to argue for government to force people toward "what is best for them." An example of this is the call for a consumption tax.

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The "Bootleggers and Baptists" of the Coronavirus Crisis

HealthU.S. HistoryWorld History

Blog03/20/2020

Although it doesn't explain everything, it's always a good idea to ask "who benefits" whenever governments step in to "solve" a crisis.

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Even When They're Wrong, We Can Learn From Understanding Others' Theories

Other Schools of ThoughtPhilosophy and Methodology

Blog03/20/2020

Learning the history of economic thought is important not because every economist has been right, but because we can learn from their mistakes.

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No, Technology Shocks Aren't Behind Recurring Business Cycles

Business CyclesInterventionismOther Schools of Thought

Blog03/19/2020

Finn Kydland and Edward C. Prescott (KP), the 2004 Nobel laureates in economics think that technological shocks can explain 70 percent of economic fluctuations in postwar US data. Unfortunately their quantitative methods are simplistic and ignore the real problem: central banking.

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The Fed Is a One-Trick Pony

Financial MarketsMonetary PolicyU.S. Economy

Blog03/19/2020

Printing up paper money—which is the Fed's solution to nearly everything—will not bring about a miraculous replacement of the lost goods and services or repair broken supply chains.

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