Mises Wire

Why Voting Doesn't Tell Us What Voters Really Want

Decentralization and SecessionStrategy

Blog02/01/2020

In a large enough democracy, the impact of an individual vote is statistically zero on the margin. 

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Why Democracy Doesn't Give Us What We Want

Philosophy and MethodologyPolitical Theory

Blog01/30/2020

Uncritically holding democracy out as an ideal overlooks the question of whether market democracy or political democracy better serves citizens.

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What We Really Mean When We Talk About Values and Prices in the Marketplace

PricesValue and Exchange

Blog01/24/2020

Values of goods are not static things that can be used for central planning. Values apply only to a particular transaction at a particular place and at a given time by human beings.

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Why "One Man, One Vote" Doesn't Work

Decentralization and Secession

Blog01/23/2020

Efforts to abolish the US Senate because it's "undemocratic" employ a very crude and dangerous type of majoritarianism.

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Why Bad GDP Metrics Lead to Bad Policy

Booms and Busts

Blog01/22/2020

Our flawed economic measure called GDP leads to a flawed and skewed view of the economy in which consumer spending is the most important metric.

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What Free Market Money Would Look Like

Money and BanksMoney and Banking

Monetary affairs have always been subject to government intervention of one kind or another, but there is no reason money could not be produced and regulated in a free marketplace.

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What Will It Take to Get the Public to Embrace Sound Money?

Financial MarketsMoney and BanksMoney and Banking

Blog01/16/2020

If the small sample size of monetary history is any guide, the combination of asset market crashes and high goods inflation empowers sound money forces in the political arena. At the moment, neither of those factors are in play.

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Will a Credit Crisis Threaten Boris's 2020 Brexit Plans?

Decentralization and SecessionFinancial MarketsGlobal Economy

Blog01/11/2020

Last month's election gave Boris Johnson a strong majority in Parliament, but two economic wildcards could trip his new government up.

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