Mises Wire

The Greatest Thing the Roman Empire Ever Did Was Go Away

World History

Blog1 hour ago

Scheidel contends that the fall of Rome precipitated the kind of competition-driven innovation that made modernity possible in the first place. Rome’s greatest gift to posterity is that, in disappearing, it made room for the West to rise.

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When Is Short Selling Fraudulent?

Financial Markets

Blog6 hours ago

Shorting more than the total outstanding shares isn’t perverse or fraudulent, whereas naked short selling—depending on the context—might be.

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Almost a Year Later, There’s Still No Evidence Showing Governments Can Control the Spread of Covid-19

Health

Blog02/23/2021

The covid lockdowners still have no explanation for why California and Florida—with such different covid policies—have similar covid death rates. The White House's spokesman on the matter could only say it's "just a little beyond our explanation.”

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The Economics and Ethics of Government Default, Part I

Monetary PolicyTaxes and SpendingPhilosophy and Methodology

What would it mean for the economy if by one fell swoop not just the debt owed to the central bank, but all of it disappeared?

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No, Drops in Money Velocity Don't Offset Money Printing

InflationMoney and BankingOther Schools of Thought

Blog02/23/2021

According to popular thinking, the sharp decline in money velocity since June 2008 is likely to neutralize recent strong money supply increases’ effect on price inflation ahead. This is a fallacy.

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India's Farming Reform: A Lesson in Interest Group Politics

Cronyism and CorporatismPrice ControlsProtectionism and Free Trade

Blog02/23/2021

If Punjabi farmers had been portrayed as affluent, the media would view them as greedy entrepreneurs. But leveraging the political capital of perceived powerlessness has allowed them to obscure their true status as rent seekers. 

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The Drive for State and Federal Protective Tariffs in Early America

Protectionism and Free TradeTaxes and SpendingU.S. History

Blog02/22/2021

Every depression generates a clamor among many groups for special privileges at the expense of the rest of society—and the American depression that struck in 1784–85 was no exception.

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"Weapons of Mass Destruction": The Last Refuge of the Global Interventionist

War and Foreign Policy

Blog02/22/2021

The threat of “nuclear proliferation” remains one of the great catch-all reasons—the other being “humanitarian” intervention—given for why the US regime and its allies ought to be given unlimited power to invade foreign states and impose sanctions at any given time.

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