Mises Wire

The State Is a Predator. It Can't Be Used to Achieve Libertarian Ends

Philosophy and Methodology

Blog01/30/2020

In portraying the state as an integral part of economy and society, advocates of "state capacity libertarianism" ignore the state's unique political, i.e., predatory, nature.

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The Bank of England's Governor Fears a Liquidity Trap

Money and BanksCapital and Interest TheoryMoney and BankingOther Schools of Thought

Blog01/17/2020

The demand for goods is not constrained by the amount of money, but by the production of goods and services available to trade for money.

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To Be Useful, Data Needs Theory

Philosophy and Methodology

Blog12/28/2019

Statistical data is merely history, but a competent historian does not simply let the events speak for themselves. He arranges them according to the ideas underlying the general notions he uses in their presentation. He does not report facts as they happened, but only relevant facts.

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The Instability of Markets Is Not Nearly as Bad as the Instability of Government Policy

Free MarketsInterventionism

Blog11/20/2019

Many advocates claim government intervention is necessary because markets are too unstable. The real instability, however, comes from the immense uncertainty over what government will do next with its vast and arbitrary power.

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The Hidden Costs of a Universal Basic Income

Labor and Wages

Blog10/10/2019

Supporters of the universal basic income claim it ends dependence on markets, bosses, family, and bureaucrats. But it doesn't eliminate dependence. It only transfers dependence to the central state.

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The Nationalist Case for Free Trade, in the Words of Classical Economists

Protectionism and Free Trade

Blog09/16/2019

The classical economists were also nationalists, and they viewed free trade as one of the most important means for advancing the security, prosperity, and cultural achievements of their own nations.

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The Central Banks Lift House Prices and Rents, But Not Everywhere

Central banks have been at the center of the world's rapidly inflating housing prices.

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