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Credit Policies of the Federal Reserve System

BooksJuly 17, 2009
Charles Hardy examines the history of the Federal Reserve's policies and their impact on the organization of the banking system in the post-World War I period...

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Credit Policies of the Federal Reserve

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Now available in eBook format Charles O Hardy's 616 page tome on the policies of the Fed!

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Charles Hardy

PROFILE

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Credit Policies of the Federal Reserve System

Charles Hardy examines the history of the Federal Reserve's policies and their impact on the organization of the...

Central Banking in the United States IV: The Federal Reserve System

Online Text Chapter from The Mystery of Banking

1. THE INFLATIONARY STRUCTURE OF THE FED

The Origins of the Federal Reserve: The Advent of the National Banking System

Online Text Chapter from The Case Against the Fed

It should now be crystal clear what the attitude of commercial banks is and almost always will be toward the Central Bank in their country. The Central Bank is their support, their staff and shield against the winds of competition and of people trying to obtain money which they believe to be their own property waiting in the banks' vaults. The Central Bank crucially bolsters the confidence of the gulled public in the banks and deters runs upon them.

The Origins of the Federal Reserve

BooksFebruary 8, 2011
The Fed did not originate as a policy response to national need. It was founded by two groups of elites: government officials and large financial and banking interests.

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New Book: 'The Fed at One Hundred: A Critical View on the Federal Reserve System'

BlogJuly 31, 2014
fedbookDoug French writes: "Looking for a hideously expensive book about the Fed with contributions...

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America's Money Machine: The Story of the Federal Reserve

BooksMay 27, 2009
Groseclose shows that at no time in its history has the Fed actually achieved what it promised: low inflation, economic stability, stable growth, reliable regulation of the banking system.

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Cheap Money, Gold, and the Federal Reserve Bank Policy

JournalsJuly 6, 2007
The present glut in the money markets, with excessively cheap money and its attendant evils and dangers to the credit structure of the country, is due to the concurrence of three main causes.

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The Fed at One Hundred: A Critical View on the Federal Reserve System

BlogJuly 31, 2014

Some great contributors. This might even be worth the high price:

Including contributions from David Howden, Guido Hulsmann, Thomas DiLorenzo, Thomas Woods, Robert Murphy, Shawn Ritenour, Jeffrey...

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Origins of the Federal Reserve: Wall Street Discontent

Online Text Chapter from The Case Against the Fed

By the 1890s, the leading Wall Street bankers were becoming increasingly disgruntled with their own creation, the National Banking System. In the first place, while the banking system was partially centralized under their leadership, it was not centralized enough. Above all, there was no revered Central Bank to bail out the commercial banks when they got into trouble, to serve as a “lender of last resort,” The big bankers couched their complaint in terms of “inelasticity,” The money supply, they grumbled, wasn't “elastic” enough.

Origins of the Federal Reserve: The Advent of the National Banking System

Audio/VideoAugust 13, 2008
From The Case Against The Fed (pp. 70-79), as narrated by Floy Lilley.

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Effects of the War on the Money, Banking, Credit System of the United States

BooksSeptember 27, 2011
Students of money and banking will find this volume filled with solid information and marked by penetrating insight and illuminating interpretation.

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Central Banking in the United States III: The National Banking System

Online Text Chapter from The Mystery of Banking

1. THE CIVIL WAR AND THE NATIONAL BANKING SYSTEM

The Civil War wrought an even more momentous change in the nation’s banking system than had the War of 1812. The early years of the war were financed by printing paper money—greenbacks—and the massive printing of money by the Treasury led to a universal suspension of specie payments by the Treasury itself and by the nation’s banks, at the end of December 1861. For the next two decades, the United States was once again on a depreciating inconvertible fiat standard.

Part B: Cyclical Policy to Eliminate Economic Fluctuations

Online Text Page from The Causes of the Economic Crisis, and Other Essays Before and After the Great Depression, Ch. 2. Monetary Stabilization and Cyclical Policy (1928)

I. STABILIZATION OF THE PURCHASING POWER OF THE MONETARY UNIT AND ELIMINATION OF THE TRADE CYCLE

1. Currency School’s Contribution

“Stabilization” of the purchasing power of the monetary unit would also lead, at the same time, to the ideal of an economy without any changes. In the stationary economy there would be no “ups” and “downs” of business. Then, the sequence of events would flow smoothly and steadily. Then, no unforeseen event would interrupt the provisioning of goods.

VII. The New Monetary System

Online Text Page from The Causes of the Economic Crisis, and Other Essays Before and After the Great Depression, Ch. 1. Stabilization of the Monetary Unit — From the Viewpoint of Theory (1923)

1. First Steps

The bedrock and cornerstone of the provisional new monetary system must be the absolute prohibition of the issue of any additional notes not completely covered by gold.

Origins of the Federal Reserve - Digital Book

Bookstore
Where did this thing called the Fed come from? Murray Rothbard has the answer here -- in phenomenal detail that will make your head spin. In one extended essay, one that reads like a detective story, he has put together the most comprehensive and fascinating account based on a century's...

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16. Full Employment and Monetary Policy

Online Text Page from Economic Freedom and Interventionism, Ch. II. Interventionism

At the price determined in an unhampered market all those who consider it satisfactory can sell and all those who are prepared to pay it can buy. if commodities remain unsold, this is not due to their "unsalability" but to speculation on the part of their owners; they hold out because they expect that they will be able to sell later at a higher price.

Federal Reserve: central bank policies have no effect

BlogApril 27, 2005

The Federal Reserve seems determined to deny the role they and President Bush has played in creating the hugh U.S. current account deficit. First it was Ben Bernanke who tried to blame it on a "global...

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