Business Cycles / Mark Thornton

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How We Should Name Business Cycles

Booms and BustsMoney and BanksBusiness CyclesMoney and Banking

Blog06/16/2017
Economists have long played semantic games with how they name business cycles. This is how they should do it.

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Robert Shiller Is Shilling for the State

Booms and BustsBusiness Cycles

Blog05/30/2017
For economist Robert Shiller, housing bubbles result from too little government regulation.

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Wine, Art, and Ferraris: The Bubble in Luxury Goods

Booms and BustsBusiness Cycles

Blog05/24/2017
Our inflationary economy is sending the prices of luxury goods soaring — while prices on products for regular people are often flat.

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Why Understanding "Roundaboutness" Is so Important

Booms and BustsBusiness Cycles

Blog03/09/2017
Making production processes more roundabout results in greater production in terms of the quantity produced and a lower cost on a per-unit basis.

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Skyscraper Alert in China?

Booms and BustsBusiness Cycles

Blog10/18/2016

Putting the finishing touches on the world's largest building in China

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The Stinky Japanese Bond

Money and BanksBusiness CyclesMoney and Banking

Blog09/28/2016

Central banks have been on a bond-buying spree. This is good for governments deep in debt. But it is a risky and dangerous policy for the rest of us.

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Amazon = $3 Trillion?

Booms and BustsThe FedFinancial MarketsBusiness Cycles

Blog05/04/2016

Let us see how close this venture capitalist comes to putting a $3 trillion price tag on Amazon at its all-time high price.

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A Boom Town Recession That Could Save Us All

Big GovernmentBooms and BustsThe FedGlobal EconomyU.S. HistoryWar and Foreign PolicyBusiness CyclesGold Standard

Blog03/23/2016

Recessions are good for an economy because they involve a resolution process, but a big recession for this boom town could be great for the world economy.

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The Container Ship Curse?

Booms and BustsGlobal EconomyBusiness Cycles

Blog03/04/2016

The world's largest container ship just entered a US port. Just in time for record low levels in the Baltic Dry Shipping Index, which is a measure of how much ships can charge.

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