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Ludwig von Mises: "This, then, is freedom in the external life of manthat he is independent of the arbitrary power of his fellows. Such freedom is no natural right. It did not exist under primitive conditions. It arose in the process of social development and its final completion is the work of mature Capitalism." - Socialism


Quotable MisesThis database of quotations from Mises was prepared for The Quotable Mises edited by Mark Thornton, available from the Mises Institute store for $20. Send corrections to the editor. Here is a source page on the editions of the books referenced.

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Top> Browse by subject: Rational Action
AuthorQuoteSourcePageSubject
Ludwig von MisesThe fundamental thesis of rationalism is unassailable. Man is a rational being; that is, his actions are guided by reason.Theory and History p. 269Rational Action
Ludwig von MisesRational and irrational always mean: reasonable or not from the point of view of the ends sought. There is no such thing as absolute rationality or irrationality.Omnipotent Government p. 113Rational Action
Ludwig von MisesThe assertion that there is irrational action is always rooted in an evaluation of a scale of values different from our own. Whoever says that irrationality plays a role in human action is merely saying that his fellow men behave in a way that he does not consider correct.Epistemological Problems of Economics p. 33Rational Action
Ludwig von MisesRational conduct means that man, in face of the fact that he cannot satisfy all his impulses, desires, and appetites, forgoes the satisfaction of those which he considers less urgent.Human Action pp. 17172; p. 172Rational Action
Ludwig von MisesAction is, by definition, always rational. One is unwarranted in calling goals of action irrational simply because they are not worth striving for from the point of view of ones own valuations.Epistemological Problems of Economics p. 35Rational Action