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The Ludwig von Mises Institute

Advancing Austrian Economics, Liberty, and Peace

Advancing the scholarship of liberty in the tradition of the Austrian School

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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Mises's Coat of Arms

The Mises Institute
What is the Mises Institute?
Are you virtual or do you really exist?
Why is the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama?
Are you part of Auburn University?
How are you funded?
What is that Coat of Arms all about?
How can I join as a member and what do I get?
Are there other Mises Institutes? What is your relationship?
How do you pronounce Mises?

Mises.org
What's on this site?
Why do you have a store when you could use Amazon etc.?
How much traffic does Mises.org get?
Do you have a forum?
Will you link to me if I link to you?
How are you related to other sites?
Do you have an RSS feed?
Do you accept unsolicited submissions?
What is your reprint policy?
What is your privacy policy?

Ideas
What's the point? What is Austrian Economics?
Are you conservative, libertarian, anarchist, socialist, or what?
What is that foreign-language slogan I see here and there?

Educational
What should I read first?
What age should people begin studying economics?
How many Austrian professors are there?
Do you offer courses for credit or degrees?
Is there an Austrian School university or graduate school somewhere?
I'm visiting Vienna. What should I see that is Austrian related?
I'm visiting New York. What was Mises's address?
I'm still in New York. What was Murray Rothbard's address?
Where can I visit Mises's grave?
Where can I visit Rothbard's grave?

Submit a question

 

What is the Mises Institute?

The Mises Institute is a research center, founded as a 501(c)(3) organization in 1982, that is dedicated to supporting the intellectual tradition, particularly in economic and political theory, represented by Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973), who taught in Vienna, Geneva, and New York. The Mises Institute, founded with the blessing of Mises's widow, Margit (1890-1993), who served as chairman, sponsors teaching programs and professional meetings, publishes journals and books, makes available audio and video, offers student assistance, and otherwise provides a wide range of services to uphold the Misesian tradition. The Mises Institute is not a "think tank" in the conventional sense because it serves no political party, offers no revolving door for public officials, nor seeks to embroil itself in the pseudo-sciences of social and economic management. Rather, the Mises Institute backs research and writing in defense of Austrian economics, the market economy, private property, sound money, and peaceful international relations, while opposing government intervention as economically and socially destructive. Please join as a Member!  [ back to faq]

Are you virtual or do you really exist?

We exist! Take a tour, of our academic facilities in Auburn, Alabama. [ back to faq]

What's on this site anyway?
Mises.org consists of some 33,100 pages, uses 5 gigabytes of hard disk, delivers 15 gigs of logfiles, and produces 1.8 million page views for 750,000 visitors per month generating a monthly hit total of 16 million (that's big, and date information too: we can even update this page to keep up with growth). We have some 500 books in many formats by Austrian thinkers,some 1000 hours of media files that includes new and old recordings of lectures and classroom work, a radio station with channels, archives of all our publications, 4000 daily articles, a great and active blog, biography, information about events, a book store, the card catalog of our house library, the Austrian Syllabus Project, some very nice charts from the financial markets and data bureaus, vast article archives from our study guide, information about fellowships, a quiz, a calendar, a film list, an awards archive, Mises Circle songs, a faculty list, and many more things. We apologize for the imperfect organizational structure. Thank goodness for Google. [ back to faq]

What is your reprint policy?

Insofar as it is possible, the Mises Institute publishes in Creative Commons, which comes as close to a free-market system as is possible given the prevailing mercantilism of copyright. We wish we could but can't grant open rights to all things. Web rights are not the same as print rights, and just because we have been granted some rights doesn't mean that we ourselves can grant such rights. For Daily Articles, matters are more simple: print it. In general, we prefer links to web reprints if only because the author might like to make changes to an article later. Our tendency is to avoid exclusive rights though we are open to anything. [ back to faq]

What is your privacy policy?
The full text is here. [ back to faq]

Why have a store when you could use Amazon, etc.?   The main purpose of the catalog is to provide the highest-quality means of distributing Mises Institute publications and books, which is something most publishers do themselves, and are expected to do in these times. As a service surrounding that primary task, we provide other Austro-libertarian works that are related and round out one's education and collection, and, in doing so, a catalog such as our saves on search costs and offers a certain quality control. We can also carry books others do not (including out of print works), as well as spectacular memorbilia items. Our delivery service is outstanding, with even faster delivery than most. But it is not really a commercial venture so much as an extension of the overall mission of the Institute. Buying books from us directly rather than going through another distributor actually ends up supporting our work. It's a small store but it does a lot of good

What is Austrian Economics?

The term "Austrian School" refers to the national origin of the School's founder, Carl Menger (1840-1921), who was one of the three economists who sparked the "marginalist revolution" in economic thought. As with many monikers in history, it was named by its enemies from the German Historical School, who sought to disparage its worth by calling it Austrian (read: unscientific, Aristotelian, deductivist, etc.). Over time, however, the Mengerians accepted the term, and today it is worn as a badge of honor (whereas hardly anyone remembers the Schmollerites of the German Historical School). Since World War II, the Austrian School has mostly been an American School, though today it finds adherents all over the world. [ back to faq]

What should I read first?

We've put together a list of books for beginners, some of which are available online. Whether you buy them from us or some place else, they provide a solid grounding in what this is all about. We also have what we have called the "core" of Austrian economics. If you have more time, read Mises's Human Action or Rothbard's Man, Economy, and State. The text of each is online. If you only have a few minutes, see "Why Austrian Economics Matters." If you learn better by listening, hear Rothbard's "Mises in One Lesson." Hear more Rothbard for economics, and Robert LeFevre for libertarian theory. [ back to faq]

Why is the Mises Institute in Auburn, Alabama?

In 1982, when the Mises Institute was founded, Auburn University was one of the few universities in the world with members of its economics department particularly tolerant of, or even interested in, the Austrian tradition. The School of Business was hospitable, and persuasively pointed out that the Institute would thrive in Auburn because of the town's beauty, accessibility, and affordability. After all, if we were to have visiting scholars and students on an ongoing basis, low rents and pleasant living are very important. We opened our doors here in 1983 in a basement room, moved to a shed behind the football stadium, then to the business school in 1992, and finally to our own place near the School of Business in 1998. We adore our town, and so do all domestic and international visitors, even those from ballyhooed lands of fashion and finery. Auburn has its own glorious way about it, and has been very kind to the Mises Institute from the beginning. [ back to faq]

Are you conservative, libertarian, anarchist, socialist, or what?

We are Misesians! The media will typically describe all non-socialists as conservatives, so we are usually lumped in among them, though the actual orientation of the Institute is libertarian. This designation can encompass a wide range of thought from Jeffersonian classical liberalism to the modern anarcho-capitalism of Murray N. Rothbard (1926-1995), Mises's American student and the founding vice president of the Mises Institute. (Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr., is the founding president.) Nor do we insist on the term libertarian, because it can often create more confusions than it clarifies. The core conviction is what matters: peaceful exchange makes everyone better off; private property is the first principle of liberty; intervention destroys wealth; society and economy need no central management to achieve orderliness. Given these views, it would make sense that some of our biggest critics, apart from the predictable ones on the left, are often from varieties of right-wing thought (protectionist, imperialist, Luddite, moralist, etc.) that have their own agenda for what they want the state to do. Though the editorial policy of the Institute is rooted in strict attachment to principle, there is a great deal of diversity among our 200+ adjunct scholars. This diversity is on display at such venues as our Austrian Scholars Conference. It is also correct to distinguish between Austrian economics as a value-free science and libertarian political economy, which is rooted in many different philosophical points of view. [ back to faq]
 

Are you part of Auburn University?

This question usually means: are you funded by Auburn University, and the answer is no. We have a good working relationship with the university on many levels but our funding is entirely private and our organizational structure is independent of the university. [ back to faq]

How are you funded?

We are funded by the private donations of individuals, businesses, and foundations. We accept no government funds (yes, the funds have been offered) and we tend to be eschewed by large foundations and corporations (we accept no contract work). However, these strictures place a rather severe limit on our resources and growth potential. Please help us overcome the odds. We also offer services to make it easier for you to integrate your support for the Mises Institute with a range of tax-saving strategies. Contact our development office. [ back to faq]

What's the point?

The point is to provide sanctuary for Austro-libertarian scholars, to back the advance of social and economic science, and inspire an intellectual revolution that secures liberty for the future. The inspiration for these goals come from Mises's life. In 1934, he was in Vienna, teaching at the university, working at the Chamber of Commerce and conducting his private seminar as he had for years. But he no longer felt safe, given the rise of Hitler. He wisely accepted a position in Geneva at an independent institute, and wrote the German edition of Human Action before coming to the US in 1940. The Nazis did in fact ransack his old apartment and steal the books and papers he left behind. The first mission of the Mises Institute, then, is to be a sanctuary for liberty in illiberal times, both in our physical space and in the spirit conveyed in all our work, so that science can proceed apace. And yet, the Mises Institute does not merely want to inspire and protect a remnant. Like Mises, we hope for intellectual revolution and global political transformation toward a society in which person and property are always and everywhere safe from violence and coercion. [ back to faq]

What is that Coat of Arms all about?

The Mises Institute's coat of arms is that of the Mises family, awarded in 1881 when Ludwig von Mises's great-grandfather Mayer Rachmiel Mises was ennobled by the Emperor Franz Josef I of Austria. In the upper right-hand quadrant is the staff of Mercury, god of commerce and communication. As merchants, newspaper owners, and bankers, the Mises family was successful in both. The flower on the ribbon is the Rose of Sharon, a Jewish and Christian symbol of beauty and God's favor. In the lower left-hand quadrant is a representation of the Ten Commandments. Mayer Rachmiel, as well as his father, presided over various Jewish cultural organizations in Lemberg, the city where Ludwig was born. Mises was forbidden from using the titles "von" and "Edler" (literally, "the noble") after WWI in social democratic Austria, but in the US" von" once again became part of his name. [ back to faq]

What is that foreign-language slogan I see here and there?

Tu ne cede malis sed contra audentior ito. It is from Virgil and it means "do not give in to evil but proceed ever more boldly against it." Mises wrote in 1940, after he arrived in New York having fled Europe, that he chose this sentence as a young man to be his guide in life. He returned to it again and again as he faced threats and adversity on all sides. We have it printed in the Mises Institute conservatory in many languages, and it often appears on Mises Institute t-shirts and the like. [ back to faq]

 

How can I join as a Member and what do I get?

You can become a member of the Mises Institute for an annual contribution of $50. This brings you our monthly publication, The Free Market, discounts to conferences and books, and the satisfaction that you are assisting in the best hope for liberty in the long term that is available in our times. [ back to faq]

Are there other Mises Institutes? What is your relationship?

There are Mises Institutes in Belgium, Poland, Argentina, Mexico, Russia, Romania, Brazil, Canada, Iceland  and other places around the world. We wish them all well, and hope for the creation of many more. We have no formal ties with any Institute bearing the same name and we wish to emphasize that we have no formal relationship with any of them. [ back to faq]

How do you pronounce Mises?

Mises is pronounced MEE-zus. [ back to faq]

How much traffic does Mises.org get?

So far as we can tell, this is the most trafficked institutional economics site in the world, and perhaps even the most trafficked non-university educational institution. We welcome links, and we are reasonably liberal with reprint permissions for work to which we hold copyright. [ back to faq]

Do you have a forum, an email list, etc.?

The Mises.org blog permits public comments on daily articles and new developments, and the software works so fast that it functions in a forum-like manner. An user-driven Austrian Community also exists to offer more casual exchange and discussion. Mises.org offers email services that allow you to received news and articles. Austrian academics and Mises University grads will enjoy Mises-L.. [ back to faq]

Will you link to me if I link to you?

We don't do log-rolling or quid pro quos, because the arrangements can work at cross purposes with the primary goal of delivering a high quality product to readers around the world. We hope that you have the same standards and would not link solely in order to inspire reciprocation. If you want to link to Mises.org, it is a credit to your good judgment and you are certainly welcome to do so. If you want to submit something to the blog, you may do so. We also provide a form for this. If you have a site you think someone here might be interested in, please do send it as a matter of information. Mises.org wants to be community-minded but never at the expense of content. [ back to faq]

How are you related to other sites of your scholars and staff?

The Mises Institute is only responsible for content on the Mises Institute website, which is Mises.org. We also encourage adjunct scholars, fellows, staff, members, and supporters to maintain their own sites, blogs, forums to pursue their own intellectual interests, whether or not it relates directly to the work of the Mises Insitute. This work can range from active participation on Wikipedia to blogs and sites on topics as diverse as science and music and everything under the sun. Vive la différence![ back to faq]

Do you have an RSS feed?

Not just one but thousands! You can choose one or all here. [ back to faq]

Do you accept unsolicited submissions?

Sure! Our editorial staff is pleased to offer help, and attempts to provide a quick turnaround.

How many Austrian professors are there?

It is not possible to count them all, especially as there is no trademark on the name Austrian. There are "orthodox," "heterodox," and fellow traveling Austrians, and many economists, historians, philosophers, legal scholars, investment managers, and many others in all walks of life who appreciate the insights and the availability of our resources. [ back to faq]

Do you offer courses for credit or degrees?

The Mises Institute offers no degrees. We do, however, offer the innovative Mises Academy as a rich and thorough online educational experience. We also offer a chance to pass oral examinations under our faculty, as part of our academic programs. Whether and to what extent college credit is given for coursework done at the Mises Institute is up to the institution doing the granting. Typically, most colleges and universities will offer 1 to 3 hours credit for successful attendance at the Mises University. [ back to faq]

What age should people begin studying economics?

Children can begin learning about trade-offs, opportunity costs, business, and the value of money at early ages, but formal study can wait until the high-school years. Hazlitt's Economics in One Lesson is a classic text, but for the pure logic of economics, there is also David Gordon's text An Introduction to Economic Reasoning. The Home Study Course is a bit more advanced but valuable for homeschoolers and others willing to grapple with a rigorous program.

Is there an Austrian School university or graduate school somewhere?

No. However, there are many Austrians teaching in the United States and around the world. You can see our faculty list, and also this memo from Walter Block designed for graduate students.[ back to faq]

I'm visiting Vienna. What should I see that is Austrian related?

We have a guide just for that purpose. [ back to faq]

I'm visiting New York. Where did Mises live?

He lived at 777 West End Avenue, Apartment 12E. [ back to faq]

I'm still in New York. What was Murray Rothbard's address?

He lived at 215 West 88th Street, Apartment 2E.[ back to faq]

Where can I visit Mises's grave?

Ludwig and his wife Margit are buried in Ferncliff Cemetery, 280 Secor Road, Hartsdale, New York, in Westchester County, 25 miles north of New York City. [ back to faq]

Where can I visit Rothbard's grave?

Murray and his wife Joey are buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Unionville, Virginia. This is the central part of the state, about halfway between Fredericksburg and Charlottesville, approximately 10 miles east of Orange, and 40 miles from Charlottesville. [ back to faq]

Whom can I contact for further information and help?

member services | book orders | giving | bad links | deep technical issues | academic services | permissions | [ back to faq]