1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

The Ludwig von Mises Institute

Tu Ne Cede Malis

Advancing the scholarship of liberty in the tradition of the Austrian School for 30 years

Search Mises.org

Mises Media

Other Media Sites : YouTube channel | Live webcasts | Image gallery

Top > Browse by ebook (.mobi)

Media File:AuthorCoAuthorDateFeed
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Anatomy of the State

This gives a succinct account of Rothbard’s view of the state. Following Franz Oppenheimer and Albert Jay Nock, Rothbard regards the state as a predatory entity. It does not produce anything but rather steals resources from those engaged in production. In applying this view to American history, Rothbard makes use of the work of John C. Calhoun

How can an organization of this type sustain itself? It must engage in propaganda to induce popular support for its policies. Court intellectuals play a key role here, and Rothbard cites as an example of ideological mystification the work of the influential legal theorist Charles Black, Jr., on the way the Supreme Court has become a revered institution.

Murray N. Rothbard Wednesday, July 20, 2005
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought

This is one of Rothbard’s most important scholarly works. In the first volume, Rothbard traces the history of economics from the ancient Greeks to Adam Smith; and in the second volume, he discusses British classical economics, the French school of classical liberalism, and Marxism.

Rothbard rejects the Whig view, according to which the history of economics is a story of constant progress. To the contrary, he sees economics as a battle between two conflicting schools of thought. The correct one explains prices through subjective value: this approach culminates in the Austrian School. The other view explains prices by cost, especially labor cost.

In the first volume, Rothbard stresses the great contributions of the Spanish Scholastics to the subjective tradition. Other great subjectivists included Turgot and Cantillon. Unfortunately, Adam Smith’s labor cost theories became the dominant view, especially in Britain. Rothbard regards Smith as largely a retrograde influence on economic theory.

The second volume contains a brilliant critique of Ricardian economics, showing the constraints on theory entailed by Ricardo’s static and pseudo-mathematical method. Ricardo’s successor John Stuart Mill is the object of a devastating intellectual portrait. Marxism is subjected to a merciless demolition, and Rothbard shows the roots of this system in metaphysical speculation. The French classical liberals such as Bastiat, on the other hand, contributed to the subjectivist school. A further highlight of this volume is a discussion of the bullionist controversy: the views of the Banking and Currency Schools receive extensive analysis.

Murray N. Rothbard Wednesday, September 01, 2010
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Classical Liberalism and the Austrian School

Here is the book to learn classical liberalism from the ground up, written by the foremost historian in the Austrian tradition--Ralph Raico. Every student, scholar, and freedom fan must have a copy of Classical Liberalism and the Austrian School at hand, readying them for intellectual battle!

It is indeed rare to study directly under two giants of the Austrian School. Raico wrote his dissertation under the direction of F.A. Hayek at the University of Chicago after being admitted as a high school student to Ludwig von Mises’s NYU seminar in New York. Raico and his friend and fellow Mises seminar attendee, Murray Rothbard, would turn into the modern champions of true liberalism.

Raico takes on all comers, disposing of all opponents of the market from Keynesians to Marxists and everyone in between, with crackling prose and sizzling wit. The liberal history comes alive with Raico’s pen, and at the same time quenches the reader’s thirst for detail, infusing an excitement that urges the reader to further explore.

Raico’s breadth of scholarship is on full display, combining insights and arguments from disparate points. He provides clarity to a history that is often slanted and distorted. Multiple reference lists contained in the book will serve as a classical liberal treasure trove for students and scholars for decades to come.

In his foreword, Austrian School scholar Jörg Guido Hülsmann, credits Raico with educating modern Germans about fellow countryman and forgotten liberal champion, Eugen Richter. Furthermore, the book’s preface by Raico’s friend and colleague, David Gordon, is both extensive and illuminating.

ISBN: 9781610160032
372 pages

Ralph Raico Tuesday, February 14, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Conceived in Liberty

The new single-volume edition of Conceived in Liberty is here! After so many years of having to juggle four volumes, the Mises Institute has finally put it altogether in a single, 1,616-page book. This makes it easier to read, and makes clearer just what a contribution this book is to the history of libertarian literature.

There's never been a better time to remember the revolutionary and even libertarian roots of the American founding, and there's no better guide to what this means in the narrative of the Colonial period than Murray Rothbard.

For anyone who thinks of Murray Rothbard as only an economic theorist or political thinker, this giant book is something of a surprise. It is probably his least known treatise. It offers a complete history of the Colonial period of American history, a period lost to students today, who are led to believe American history begins with the US Constitution.

Rothbard's ambition was to shed new light on Colonial history and show that the struggle for human liberty was the heart and soul of this land from its discovery through the culminating event of the American Revolution. These volumes are a tour de force, enough to establish Rothbard as one of the great American historians.

It is a detailed narrative history of the struggle between liberty and power, as we might expect, but it is more. Rothbard offers a third alternative to the conventional interpretive devices. Against those on the right who see the American Revolution as a "conservative" event, and those on the left who want to invoke it as some sort of proto-socialist uprising, Rothbard views this period as a time of accelerating libertarian radicalism. Through this prism, Rothbard illuminates events as never before.

The volumes were brought out in the 1970s, but the odd timing and uneven distribution prevented any kind of large audience. They were beloved only by a few specialists, and sought after by many, thanks to their outstanding reputation. The Mises Institute is pleased to be the publisher of this integrated book.

This single volume covers the discovery of the Americas and the colonies in the 17th century, the period of "salutary neglect" in the first half of the 18th century, the advance to revolution, from 1760-1775 and the political, military, and ideological history of the revolution and after.

Murray N. Rothbard Wednesday, November 15, 2006
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Credit Policies of the Federal Reserve System

This professionally prepared ebook is an electronic edition of the book that is designed for reading on digital readers like Nook, Kindle, iPad, Sony Reader, and other products including iPhone and Android smart phones. The text reflows depending on your font preferences and it contains links from navigation.

In this historical gem originally published in 1932, Charles Hardy examines the history of the Federal Reserve's policies and their impact on the organization of the banking system in the post-World War I period. Mr. Hardy deals with the fundamental problems of central banking policy, namely, the purposes which an organized banking system should seek to accomplish, the efficiency of the means which such a system has at its command, and the tests by which it can gauge the success of its efforts. The author provides a detailed background of central banking activities and credit control decisions for the 1920's and early 30's. Especially noted and examined is the importation and management of gold and gold certificates during this period as well as international coordination between central banks. Hardy's work is an essential review and critique of Federal Reserve policy implementation during a period which was highly influential to the Great Depression.

616 pages, originally published 1932.

Charles Hardy Friday, July 17, 2009
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Free Market Economics: A Syllabus

This little gem is a complete economics education for high-school age students. It provides lessons, study questions, activities, and an excellent list of readings for each topic under consideration. Bettina chose well because the readings all hold up, even though the syllabus came out in 1974. It still works as an excellent course in economics.

It is meant to be used alongside the book of readings also available from Mises.org. Together the set will put any student on the road to a lifetime of economic understanding.

Bettina Greaves was Mises's secretary and assistant but also an excellent economist in her own right.

Bettina Bien Greaves Thursday, April 12, 2007
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Free Market Economics: A Basic Reader

Bettina Bien Greaves put this volume together as a one-stop primer in economics that includes the best economic writing she had run across. In some ways, the choices are brilliant.

They are arranged by topic to cover the division of labor, prices, profits, property, competition, saving and investment, environment, antitrust, money and banking, advertising and marketing, and more.

Authors include Read, Mises, Bastiat, Greaves, Kirzner, Watts, Hazlitt, and many other writers.

Each essay is short and to the point. It still makes a great primer!

Bettina Bien Greaves Tuesday, April 10, 2007
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Ideas on Liberty: Essays in Honor of Paul L. Poirot

Paul Poirot is remembered by most people as the thirty-year editor of The Freeman, the monthly journal published by the Foundation for Economic Education since 1956. But Paul Poirot was much more than just an editor. Dr. Poirot was an uncompromising proponent of the ideal concept of a free society and the Austrian economic theory perspective upon which an unhampered market process is founded. Paul Poirot and his journal, The Freeman, never wavered from advancing the cause of individual liberty and the essential absolutes of private property and monetary freedom required for the achievement of a free market order.

This festschrift reflects the legacy of Paul Poirot in his life-long pursuit of the philosophy of freedom. Compiled by Robert G. Anderson and Beth Hoffman, the essays were written upon his retirement in 1987. Almost all of the authors were long-time friends and associates of Dr. Poirot.

Special thanks to Gary North for making this book available again in both print and eBook format.

144 pages, paperback, ISBN: 9781610161985


Robert G. Anderson Wednesday, August 22, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought (Complete, 1965-1968)

The most influential and famous low-circulation, typewriter-typed scholarly journal of the 20th century.

Murray N. Rothbard Monday, March 26, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Mises on Money

Before Austrian economics came on the scene, monetary theory was a hodge-podge of disjointed insights. Nobody knew how to integrate those insights into a system, much less how to integrate monetary theory with the rest of economics.

Carl Menger, founder of the Austrian School of Economics, started to unravel the mystery of money in the late 19th century. Ludwig von Mises finally cut the Gordian knot with his first magnum opus, The Theory of Money and Credit (1912), the most important single advance in monetary theory in the history of economic thought.

In that treatise, Mises erected a theory of money of astounding originality that was complete and internally integrated: as well as externally integrated with modern, subjectivist economics in general. With this book, Mises completed the victory of the "marginal revolution" by extending its conquest to the monetary realm. In doing so, Mises finally made economics whole. In his later treatise, Human Action, Mises developed his theory further, making it even more rigorous.

While Mises' monetary writings should be required reading for any educated citizen, it can be challenging to parse some of the technical language. That is where Gary North comes in. In Mises on Money, Dr. North lucidly explains all the essential tenets of Mises' monetary theory, with his inimitable incisiveness and style. He methodically walks the reader through such topics as the origin of money, Mises' "regression theorem", fractional reserve banking, and the Austrian Business Cycle Theory. He explains why money is not "neutral," and why price stabilization is a chimera. After reading this short work, you will have a firm understanding of Austrian monetary theory, and will be in prime condition to tackle Mises' own writings on the subject.

Dr. North writes:

"In summarizing Mises's theory of money, I cover five themes: the definition of money; the optimum quantity of money and its corolary, stable prices; fractional reserve banking, and how to inhibit it; and the monetary theory of the business cycle. They are closely interrelated. Mises's system was a system."


Gary North Monday, December 12, 2011
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Money, Bank Credit, and Economic Cycles


3rd Edition - Updated and revised.

The three years since the publication of the previous English edition of Money, Bank Credit, and Economic Cycles have seen a continuation of the economic recession process set in motion after the 2007 financial crisis. This process has consisted of the inevitable microeconomic readjustment and realignment of a real productive structure which the credit expansion of the prior “speculative bubble” years had rendered unsustainable. Though governments’ fiscal and monetary policies have on many occasions been erratic and counterproductive, in the end, enormous growth in public deficits has brought on a sovereign public debt crisis in international markets. This crisis has been so severe that one by one, the different governments have been forced to take measures, even if timid ones, in the right direction, measures to reduce public spending, interventionism, and regulation of the economy, and to liberalize factor markets and make them more flexible, especially the labor market.


Can the market fully manage the money and banking sector?

Jesús Huerta de Soto, professor of economics at the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Madrid, has made history with this mammoth and exciting treatise. He integrates sweeping history and rigorous theory to make the good-as-gold case that the institutions of money and banking can be part of the free market -- without a central bank, without bailouts, without inflation, without business cycles, and without the economic instability that has characterized the age of government control.

Such a book as this comes along only once every several generations: a complete comprehensive treatise on economic theory. It is sweeping, revolutionary, and devastating--not only the most extended elucidation of Austrian business cycle theory to ever appear in print but also a decisive vindication of the Misesian-Rothbardian perspective on money, banking, and the law.

Jörg Guido Hülsmann has said that this is the most significant work on money and banking to appear since 1912, when Mises's own book was published and changed the way all economists thought about the subject.

Its five main contributions:

  • a wholesale reconstruction of the legal framework for money and banking, from the ancient world to modern times,
  • an application of law-and-economics logic to banking that links microeconomic analysis to macroeconomic phenomena,
  • a comprehensive critique of fractional-reserve banking from the point of view of history, theory, and policy,
  • an application of the Austrian critique of socialism to central banking,
  • the most comprehensive look at banking enterprise from the point of view of market-based entrepreneurship.

Those are the main points but, in fact, this only scratches the surface. Indeed, it would be difficult to overestimate the importance of this book. De Soto provides also a defense of the Austrian perspective on business cycles against every other theory, defends the 100% reserve perspective from the point of view of Roman and British law, takes on the most important objections to full reserve theory, and presents a full policy program for radical reform.

It was Hülsmann's review of the Spanish edition that inspired the translation that led to this Mises Institute edition in English. The result is astonishing: an 875-page masterpiece that utterly demolishes the case for fiat currency and central banking, and shows that these institutions have compromised economic stability and freedom, and, moreover, are intolerable in a free society.

De Soto has set new scholarly standards with this detailed discussion of monetary reform from an Austro-libertarian point of view. Huerta de Soto’s solid elaboration of his arguments along these lines makes his treatise a model illustration of the Austrian approach to the study of the relationship between law and economics.

It could take a decade for the full implications of this book to be absorbed but this much is clear: all serious students of these subject matters will have to master this treatise.

Jesus Huerta de Soto Tuesday, March 14, 2006
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Organized Crime: The Unvarnished Truth About Government

Politics and thieves, coercion and regulation, fascism and the Fed, centralization and liberty, workers and unions, trade and freedom, free-market achievements and government disasters in American history—this book covers it all!

Organized Crime collection of essays in the tradition of Austrian political economy—a combination of applied economics and the study of governmental reality. Unlike “mainstream” economists who are content to spin mathematical model after mathematical model which explain little or nothing about the real world, DiLorenzo’s focus has always been just the opposite—to use economic understanding to gain a better understanding of how the political-economic world works. Austrian economics is indispensable to succeed at this task.

The book is divided into six sections: “Coercion and Regulation” analyzes various aspects of government regulation of business; “Politics and Thieves” is of course about the inherent nature of government; “Centralization versus Liberty” discusses the never-ending quest by statists to monopolize and centralize political power so as to isolate themselves as much as possible from public influence; “Money and the State” describes the myriad evils of central banking, which was always thought of by its original proponents in America as an engine of corruption; “Workers and Unions” discusses various labor union myths and superstitions that too often cloud the public’s thinking about the reality of labor markets; and “Truth and Lies about Markets” is a taxonomy of some of the main market-failure myths that have long been used to illegitimately advance the cause of economic interventionism, as well as some newer ones.

In Organized Crime: The Unvarnished Truth About Government, Thomas J. DiLorenzo strips away the vast apparatus of establishment propaganda and exposes the government smokescreen. No statist lies are safe from his scrutiny. In his straightforward and methodical approach to uncovering truths of freedom, liberty has a champion.

Thomas J. DiLorenzo Friday, July 20, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Principles of Ethics: Anthology

This professionally prepared ebook is an electronic edition of the book that is designed for reading on digital readers like Nook, Kindle, iPad, Sony Reader, and other products including iPhone and Android smart phones. The text reflows depending on your font preferences and it contains links from navigation.

This two volume treatise by the classic liberal political theorist and philosopher Herbert Spencer has been considered by many to be his most influential work. The full compilation of its parts lasted almost a half century from the early 1840's to its publication in 1898. In this treatise, Spencer attempts to provide a basis for ethics built on principles of evolutionary biology. A wide array of topics are covered and explored involving conduct and the induction of ethics as well as justice, rights, and beneficence. This work is a crucial philosophical contribution to these and other subjects related to ethical conduct.

This very well may be the only eBook on the web for Herbert Spencer's Principles of Ethics!


General Preface

Preface to Vol. I

Preface to Part I: When First Issued Seperately

Part I: The Data of Ethics

Chapter I: Conduct In General

Chapter II: The Evolution of Conduct

Chapter III: Good And Bad Conduct

Chapter IV: Ways of Judging Conduct

Chapter V: The Physical View

Chapter VI: The Biological View

Chapter VII: The Psychological View

Chapter VIII: The Sociological View

Chapter IX: Criticisms And Explanations

Chapter X: The Relativity of Pains And Pleasures

Chapter XI: Egoism Versus Altruism

Chapter XII: Altruism Versus Egoism

Chapter XIII: Trial And Compromise

Chapter XIV: Conciliation

Chapter XV: Absolute And Relative Ethics

Chapter XVI: The Scope of Ethics

Appendix To Part I: The Conciliation

Part II: The Inductions of Ethics

Chapter I: The Confusion of Ethical Thought

Chapter II: What Ideas And Sentiments Are Ethical?

Chapter III: Aggression

Chapter IV: Robbery

Chapter V: Revenge

Chapter VI: Justice

Chapter VII: Generosity

Chapter VIII: Humanity

Chapter IX: Veracity

Chapter X: Obedience

Chapter XI: Industry

Chapter XII: Temperance

Chapter XIII: Chastity

Chapter XIV: Summary of Inductions

Part III: The Ethics of Individual Life

Chapter I: Introductory

Chapter II: Activity

Chapter III: Rest

Chapter IV: Nutrition

Chapter V: Stimulation

Chapter VI: Culture

Chapter VII: Amusements

Chapter VIII: Marriage

Chapter IX: Parenthood

Chapter X: General Conclusions

References

References to Vol. I

Titles of Works

-------------------------------

Preface To Vol. II

Preface to Part IV: When First Issued Seperately

Part IV: Justice

Chapter I: Animal-Ethics

Chapter II: Sub-Human Justice

Chapter III: Human Justice

Chapter IV: The Sentiment of Justice

Chapter V: The Idea of Justice

Chapter VI: The Formula of Justice

Chapter VII: The Authority of This Formula

Chapter VIII: Its Corollaries

Chapter IX: The Right To Physical Integrity

Chapter X: The Rights To Free Motion And Locomotion

Chapter XI: The Rights To The Uses Of Natural Media

Chapter XII: The Right of Property

Chapter XIII: The Right of Incorporeal Property

Chapter XIV: The Rights of Gift And Bequest

Chapter XV: The Rights of Free Exchange And Free Contract

Chapter XVI: The Right To Free Industry

Chapter XVII: The Rights of Free Belief And Worship

Chapter XVIII: The Rights of Free Speech And Publication

Chapter XIX: A Retrospect With An Addition

Chapter XX: The Rights of Women

Chapter XXI: The Rights of Children

Chapter XXII: Political Rights—So-Called

Chapter XXIII: The Nature of The State

Chapter XXIV: The Constitution of The State

Chapter XXV: The Duties of The State

Chapter XXVI: The Limits of State-Duties

Chapter XXVII: The Limits of State-Duties Continued

Chapter XXVIII: The Limits of State-Duties Continued

Chapter XXIX: The Limits of State-Duties Concluded

Part V: Negative Beneficence

Chapter I: Kinds of Altruism

Chapter II: Restraints On Free Competition

Chapter III: Restraints On Free Contract

Chapter IV: Restraints On Undeserved Payments

Chapter V: Restraints On Displays of Ability

Chapter VI: Restraints On Blame

Chapter VII: Restraints On Praise

Chapter VIII: The Ultimate Sanctions

Part VI: Positive Beneficence

Chapter I: Marital Beneficence

Chapter II: Parental Beneficence

Chapter III: Filial Beneficence

Chapter IV: Aiding The Sick And The Injured

Chapter V: Succour To The Ill-Used And The Endangered

Chapter VI: Pecuniary Aid To Relatives And Friends

Chapter VII: Relief of The Poor

Chapter VIII: Social Beneficence

Chapter IX: Political Beneficence

Chapter X: Beneficence At Large

Appendices

Appendix A: The Kantian Idea of Rights

Appendix B: The Land-Question

Appendix C: The Moral Motive

Appendix D: Conscience In Animals

Appendix E: Replies To Criticisms

References

Titles of Works Referred To

Subject Index

Herbert Spencer Tuesday, August 28, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 1

RAE VOLUME 1

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The Review of Austrian Economics, was founded and edited by Murray N. Rothbard and functioned as the premier Austrian School scholarly journal between 1987 and 1997. From 1995 to 1997, it was edited by Walter Block, Hans-Hermann Hoppe, and Joseph T. Salerno. This collection of volumes 1 through 10 was published by the Mises Institute.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Contents

Introductory Editorial

Murray N. Rothbard and Walter Block

Editorial: The Inflationary Chaos Ahead

Henry Hazlitt

1.Why Subjectivism?

Leland Yeager

2.Wages, Prices, and Employment: Von Mises and the Progressives

Lowell Gallaway and Richard K. Vedder

3.A Critique of Monetarist and Austrian Doctrines on the Utility and Value of Money

Richard H. Timberlake, Jr.

4.Breaking Out of the Walrasian Box: The Cases of Schumpeter and Hansen

Murray N. Rothbard

5.Two Forgotten Articles by Ludwig von Mises on the Rationality of Socialist Economic Calculation

William Keizer

6.Rent Seeking: Some Conceptual Problems and Implications

E.C. Pasour, Jr.

7.Some Austrian Perspectives on Keynesian Fiscal Policy and the Recovery in the Thirties

Gene Smiley

8.GNP, PPR, and the Standard of Living

Robert Batemarco

I.Review Essays

9.The Economics of Time and Ignorance: A Review

Charles W. Baird

10.Method versus Methodology: A Note on The Ultimate Resource

M.W. Sinnett

II.Reviews

11.The Evolution of Cooperation

Roger Arnold

12.Competition versus Monopoly: Combines Policy in Perspective

Roger Arnold

13.A Response to the Framework Document for Amending the Combines Investigation Act

Roger Arnold

14.Writing History: Essay on Epistemology

Edward H. Kaplan

15.The Unseen Dimensions of Wealth: Towards a Generalized Economic Theory

Edward H. Kaplan

About the Contributors

About the Editor

Murray N. Rothbard Walter Block Friday, April 20, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 10

RAE VOLUME 10

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 2

RAE VOLUME 2

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set as digital books, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Monday, May 07, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 3

RAE VOLUME 3

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Monday, May 07, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 4

RAE VOLUME 4

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Monday, May 07, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 5

RAE VOLUME 5

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 6

RAE VOLUME 6

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 7

RAE VOLUME 7

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 8

RAE VOLUME 8

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) Review of Austrian Economics, Volume 9

RAE VOLUME 9

Murray Rothbard had long dreamed of an Austrian academic journal. In 1986, his dream came true. The Mises Institute published it, and it changed everything. The Austrians could focus on internal development, highlight the contrast with the mainstream, and show their wares to the profession and the world at large.

Rothbard was an exacting editor, and results are spectacular and historic.

The individual issues have been nearly impossible to find, until now. Today you can own the entire set, learn from the pioneering articles that Murray and his co-editors saw as crucial, and see what gave the modern Austrian movement its scholarly momentum.


Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 08, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) The Foundations of Morality

Here is Hazlitt's major philosophical work, in which he grounds a policy of private property and free markets in an ethic of classical utilitarianism, understood in the way Mises understood that term. In writing this book, Hazlitt is reviving an 18th and 19th century tradition in which economists wrote not only about strictly economic issues but also on the relationship between economics and the good of society in general. Adam Smith wrote a moral treatise because he knew that many objections to markets are rooted in these concerns. Hazlitt takes up the cause too, and with spectacular results.

Hazlitt favors an ethic that seeks the long run general happiness and flourishing of all. Action, institutions, rules, principles, customs, ideals, and all the rest stand or fall according to the test of whether they permit people to live together peaceably to their mutual advantage. Critical here is an understanding of the core classical liberal claim that the interests of the individual and that of society in general are not antagonistic but wholly compatible and co-determinous.

In pushing for "rules-utilitarianism," Hazlitt is aware that he is adopting an ethic that is largely rejected in our time, even by the bulk of the liberal tradition. But he makes the strongest case possible, and you will certainly be challenged at every turn.

In addition, the writing style here is unequaled. It was written in 1964 after a lifetime of writing and thinking. He poured an enormous amount of effort into it, with the goal of completing and vindicating Mises's view of ethics, one which had not been taken up by any Misesians apart from Leland Yeager. Indeed, Yeager writes the foreword.

It is not necessary that you finally agree with Hazlitt's view to appreciate his defense of freedom and the market economy, which explains in great detail how the voluntary society benefits all its members, and how the market economy deserves to be regarded as a critical component of a flourishing civilization. His attacks on logical positivism, socialism, aestheticism, and egalitarianism are dazzling. This book will inspire, provoke, and educate.

Hazlitt personally regarded it as his most important lifetime contribution.

Henry Hazlitt Saturday, October 04, 2008
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) The Foundations of Morality

Here is Hazlitt's major philosophical work, in which he grounds a policy of private property and free markets in an ethic of classical utilitarianism, understood in the way Mises understood that term. In writing this book, Hazlitt is reviving an 18th and 19th century tradition in which economists wrote not only about strictly economic issues but also on the relationship between economics and the good of society in general. Adam Smith wrote a moral treatise because he knew that many objections to markets are rooted in these concerns. Hazlitt takes up the cause too, and with spectacular results.

Hazlitt favors an ethic that seeks the long run general happiness and flourishing of all. Action, institutions, rules, principles, customs, ideals, and all the rest stand or fall according to the test of whether they permit people to live together peaceably to their mutual advantage. Critical here is an understanding of the core classical liberal claim that the interests of the individual and that of society in general are not antagonistic but wholly compatible and co-determinous.

In pushing for "rules-utilitarianism," Hazlitt is aware that he is adopting an ethic that is largely rejected in our time, even by the bulk of the liberal tradition. But he makes the strongest case possible, and you will certainly be challenged at every turn.

In addition, the writing style here is unequaled. It was written in 1964 after a lifetime of writing and thinking. He poured an enormous amount of effort into it, with the goal of completing and vindicating Mises's view of ethics, one which had not been taken up by any Misesians apart from Leland Yeager. Indeed, Yeager writes the foreword.

It is not necessary that you finally agree with Hazlitt's view to appreciate his defense of freedom and the market economy, which explains in great detail how the voluntary society benefits all its members, and how the market economy deserves to be regarded as a critical component of a flourishing civilization. His attacks on logical positivism, socialism, aestheticism, and egalitarianism are dazzling. This book will inspire, provoke, and educate.

Hazlitt personally regarded it as his most important lifetime contribution.

Henry Hazlitt Saturday, October 04, 2008
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) The Turgot Collection: Writings, Speeches, and Letters of Anne Robert Jacques Turgot, Baron de Laune

Anne-Robert-Jacques Turgot (1727-1781) was one of the foremost classical liberals of the 18th century. In the opinion of Murray Rothbard, he was one of the greatest economists of all time, and he served with distinction under Louis XVI as Minister of the Navy and Comptroller-General. In these positions, he attempted to put into practice his free market ideas, but, owing to the opposition they encountered, the king dismissed him.

The Turgot Collection provides a well-chosen collection of Turgot’s economic writings. Although he was a disciple of the Physiocrats, he extended economic theory, in remarkably original ways, beyond what this group had accomplished. He consistently defended free trade, arguing that the local knowledge of those engaged in trade was far superior as a guide to policy than whatever could be gleaned by government bureaucrats.

Turgot, as readers of this collection will discover, also developed an early though incomplete version of the subjective theory of value and anticipated the notion of opportunity cost. He did pioneering work on the importance of the capitalist-entrepreneur in the economic process.

Turgot’s work was by no means confined to economics. Like other figures of the Enlightenment, he believed that mankind progresses through a series of historical stages. “On Universal History,” included here, elaborates this view.

Like Voltaire, Turgot hoped that his reforms could be put into effect through appeal to an enlightened monarch. In that regard, he proposed that a system of state schools should be established. In this way, he hoped, young people could be taught liberal principles; and what he regarded as the malign influence of the Church on education could be reduced.

The book also includes selections from Turgot’s correspondence with other figures of the Enlightenment, including Voltaire, Condorcet, and Hume.

The Turgot Collection will give readers a thorough grounding in the work of a major economist and advocate of freedom.


Introduction by Murray N. Rothbard

PART I: ECONOMICS

1. Reflections on the Formation and Distribution of Wealth
2. Letter to l’Abbé de Cicé, since then Bishop of Auxerre, on the Replacing of Money by Paper. Also Known as the “Letter on Paper-Money”
3. Remarks on the Notes to the Translation of Josiah Child
4. Fairs and Markets
5. In Praise of Gournay
6. Observations on a Paper by Saint-Péravey
7. Observations on the Paper by Graslin
8. Value and Money
9. Plan for a Paper on Taxation
10. Extracts from “Paper on Lending at Interest”
11. Extracts from “Letters on the Grain Trade”
12. Letter to l’Abbé Terray on the “Marque des Fers"
13. Six Projects of Edicts Which Suppresses the Corvée and Decrees the Construction of Highways for a Money Price Decreeing the Suppression of Craft-Guilds Which Repeals Certain Rules Concerning Grain Products Enacting the Suppression of the Exchange of Poissy Enacting a Change and Modification of Taxes on Suet Enacting the Suppression of Offices Connected with the Ports, Quays, Stalls and Markets of Paris

PART II: PHILOSOPHY
14. A Philosophical Review of the Successive Advances of the Human Mind
15. On Universal History

PART III: SOCIAL QUESTIONS
16. On Some Social Questions, Including the Education of the Young
17. Local Government and National Education
18. Religious Liberty “Le conciliateur”
19. Religious Equality 20. Endowments

PART IV: CORRESPONDENCE
To Voltaire
To Condorcet
To David Hume
To Mlle. de Lespinasse
To Abbé Morellet
To Dr. Josiah Tucker
To Dr. Richard Price
To du Pont
Appendix: Miscellaneous Extracts Sources Index

 

 

A.R.J. Turgot Thursday, March 17, 2011
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) The Wizards of Ozymandias

Western Civilization--the American version in particular--is in a very turbulent and, perhaps terminal condition. The sense of civility that helps give meaning to a "civilization" is in full retreat.

Butler Shaffer has, over the course of several years, written 51 wonderful essays observing the dissolution of Western culture and civilization. They have been assembled in the The Wizards of Ozymandias a captivating work full of entertaining epigrams and anecdotes, as well as enlightening commentary on current events, and historical episodes, that will keep you engaged and immersed from the first to last page. Shaffer's intellectual prowess and deep well of life experience enlightens and rouses introspection at every turn. It is immediately evident that the author has been writing on law, economics, and history for decades. This book will challenge you to more deeply contemplate the ideals of liberty. The title may be foreboding, but for all that, the book is an uplifting and gratifying read.

In his great poem "Ozymandias" Percy Shelley pictures for us the eponymous tyrant whose arrogance of power could not save him from historical oblivion. Ozymandias is a reminder of the fragile nature of every system—be it biological, institutional, or cosmic in character. As we are learning from the advanced course in history in which we seem now to be enrolled, this precariousness also applies to civilizations. It is difficult for intelligent minds to doubt that this current system is in the process of joining Ozymandias in the dust-bin of history.

Western culture has produced material and spiritual values that have done so much to humanize and civilize mankind. Unfortunately, it has also produced highly-structured institutions and practices that not only impede, but reverse these life-enhancing qualities. Is it possible for us to energize our intelligence in order to rediscover, in the debris of our dying civilization, the requisite components for a fundamentally transformed culture grounded in free, peaceful, and productive systems that sustain rather than diminish life?

In the introduction Shaffer describes how civilizations are created by individuals. In following chapters, he explains how they are destroyed by collectives which are good for little more than the destruction of what others have created. Seen in the sharp contrasts between market economies and state socialism; the fundamental struggles are between the creative energies unleashed by liberty, and the repressive forces of politics. Shaffer explores the impact that institutionalism may have on the decline of civilization.

Shaffer methodically takes the reader through the rise and decline of Western civilization using references that range from the construction of an Islamic cultural center a few blocks from the site of the former World Trade Center, to the BP disaster, to the 1951 motion picture, The Day the Earth Stood Stilland on to experiments in removing road signs and traffic lights.

What is likely to follow from this imminent “decline and fall?” Might the remnants of our terminal culture—like an estate bequeathed us by a rich benefactor—provide the foundations for a fundamentally transformed culture; one that does not cannibalize itself?

Can conditions of peace and liberty replace the wars, coercive regulation, and worship of violence that have combined to destroy our present civilization? The book ends with such questions, and invites the reader to contemplate how such a life-centered culture might arise.

If after reading this book you are not convinced that the fall of western civilization is upon us, don't grieve just yet! Shaffer is optimistic that such a collapse could be the turning point for a social transformation toward a society that embraces individual liberty and private property, and that is free from collectivism and institutionalization. Shaffer can already see the seeds of such a transformation.

"The new renaissance that seems to be emerging is fostered, in large part, by exponential increases in our capacities for communicating information to one another. Indeed, “information” may prove to be the “instrument of expansion” that will underlie a new culture."

Butler Shaffer Thursday, May 24, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) War Collectivism

War Collectivism: Power, Business, and the Intellectual Class in World War I

More than any other single period, World War I was the critical watershed for the American business system. It was a "war collectivism," a totally planned economy run largely by big-business interest through the instrumentality of the central government, which served as the model, the precedent, and the inspiration for state corporate capitalism for the remainder of the century.


Paperback, 134 pages, ISBN: 9781610162500
These essays appear together for the first time as War Collectivism.

War Collectivism in World War I
This is reprinted from A New History of Leviathan, Ronald Radosh and Murray N. Rothbard, eds. (New York: E.P. Dutton & Co., 1972), pp. 66– 110.

World War I as Fulfillment: Power and the Intellectuals
1 An earlier version of this paper was delivered at a Pacific Institute Conference on “Crisis and Leviathan,” at Menlo Park, Calif., October 1986. It appeared in print in the Journal of Libertarian Studies 9, no. 1 (Winter, 1989). It was reprinted in John V. Denson, ed., The Costs of War: America’s Pyrrhic Victories (New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Publishers, 1997). The title of this paper is borrowed from the pioneering last chapter of James Weinstein’s excellent work, The Corporate Ideal in the Liberal State, 1900–1918 (Boston: Beacon Press, 1968). The last chapter is entitled, “War as Fulfillment.”

Murray N. Rothbard Tuesday, May 15, 2012
Amazon Kindle (.mobi) What Has Government Done to Our Money?

When this gem first appeared in 1963, it took the form of a small paperback designed for mass distribution. We've conjured up that spirit again with this special edition of Rothbard's primer on money and government.

Innumerable economists, investors, commentators, and authors have learned from this book through the decades. After fifty years, it remains the best book in print on the topic, a real manifesto of sound money.

Rothbard boils down the Austrian theory to its essentials. The book also made huge theoretical advances. Rothbard was the first to prove that the government, and only the government, can destroy money on a mass scale, and he showed exactly how they go about this dirty deed. But just as importantly, it is beautifully written. He tells a thrilling story because he loves the subject so much.

The passion that Murray feels for the topic comes through in the prose and transfers to the reader. Readers become excited about the subject, and tell others. Students tell professors. Some, like the great Ron Paul of Texas, have even run for political office after having read it.

Rothbard shows precisely how banks create money out of thin air and how the central bank, backed by government power, allows them to get away with it. He shows how exchange rates and interest rates would work in a true free market. When it comes to describing the end of the gold standard, he is not content to describe the big trends. He names names and ferrets out all the interest groups involved.

Since Rothbard's death, scholars have worked to assess his legacy, and many of them agree that this little book is one of his most important. Though it has sometimes been inauspiciously packaged and is surprisingly short, its argument took huge strides toward explaining that it is impossible to understand public affairs in our time without understanding money and its destruction.

Murray N. Rothbard Wednesday, July 20, 2005